?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Kozo's Thoughts
Random, Weird, and 100% 石黒光司
Quick Life Recap and Some Stuff for the Archives 
Friday May 19th, 2006 0:35
Ohta Kouzou
I there was any doubt I was back in Montreal, the Purple Haze I had last night with the "Art Crew" certainly cleared it up quickly. That doesn't happen in Hamilton... I was great to see Em and her gang of friends again.

Quick Recap:
-I spent most of last week with Josh and Alex. Basically goofed around in the house playing poker and watching random stuff before setting off to DDT. I came away with the overwhelming feeling that there was an unresolved/unidentified tension between the three of us.

-DDT was fun. Mike and I have great chemistry and I didn't have the same kind of partner issues I had with Josh the previous 2 years. We came out of all but 1-2 rounds satisfied. We ended up with an 8-1 record before the break, but we lost the semi (which was sort of a relief). I was probably more satisfied with my Texas Hold'em split win with Tim O (who is one of my favorite people in debate, and incidentally is my new housemate's brother). So I actually made some money over the weekend ($5 net).

- If you didn't see Jon Stewart's interview with Ramesh Ponnuru, you should.




Now the archival stuff. I was recently searching Google for more information on Tsurumi Shunsuke (鶴見俊輔). Tsurumi is easily the most important/respected intellectual who is aware of my existence. What I found was an interview conducted 8 years ago for a bilingual internet journal between Tsurumi and Muro Kenji (who apparently was a classmate of my mother in school). The interview puts into clear words my own thoughts on language and communication. Unfortunately the website hosting the interview is gone and I was only able to save the interview through Google cache. The interview is entitled 文化の壁をこえて心にとどく言葉 (Language that Crosses Cultural Barriers) and it gives great insight on the nature of language, and also gives the reader a look at Tsurumi the man. For archival purposes, and to enrich my readership (all 2 of you) I'm posting both versions of the interview below.


Interview : Tsurumi Shunsuke
Language that Crosses Cultural Barriers

Seventy-six year old Tsurumi Shunsuke is one of the most influential philosophers and intellectuals in Japan today. I visited him at his home in a suburb of Kyoto to discuss the complexities of cross-cultural communication. The interview began with Shunsuke's comments on the disastrous history of English language education in Japan. We were soon soaring from one topic to another in an animated freeform punctuated by Shunsuke's great laughter and lively hand gestures. He confided to me that he couldn't use the Internet without the help of his wife.

During his long career, Shunsuke has taught in Kyoto, Tokyo, Mexico City and Montreal. He was a central figure in the Japanese Peace Movement during the 1960's and 70's and for 50 years was the editor and publisher of Shiso-no-Kagaku, a respected journal for Japanese intellectuals. He now spends his time reading, writing and receiving visitors. His curiosity and intellectual energy are exactly the same as when I met him for the first time 32 years ago.

(Muro Kenji)

A Complete Disaster

Muro:
To make our journal accessible to as many people around the world as possible, we decided to make it bilingual in English and Japanese. Bilinguality, however, means more than simply replacing text written in one language with text written in another language. Just how effective is English as a tool for communicating the essence of things between two speakers of different languages?

Tsurumi:
If you're going to put a magazine on the Internet and intend to use English as your lingua franca, you'd be making a mistake to rely on contemporary American English as your model. This magazine is a test case for seeing what happens to English when it is used as a common language by the Japanese, for seeing how Japan's own English-language culture works on the Internet.

If we simply try to follow America's lead, a global culture is not going to come about. The most we could gain from that would be a clever imitation of American culture. Not only would we fail to earn the respect of people from other countries, we wouldn't even earn the respect of the Americans.

English language education has a 130-year history in Japan, and it's been a complete disaster. Before World War II, a Japanese child would study English for three years in middle school and three years in high school. If he majored in English literature, he would get another four years of university study, for a total of ten years of English. Yet after all that, Japanese with this sort of background were utterly incapable of expressing themselves in English.

Author Shiga Naoya, who wrote in plain, powerful Japanese, told a story about how he once struck up a conversation with an Englishman. "Are you a college student?" he was asked. Shiga managed to reply, "Yes I am," but that was it. When asked "What's your major?" he mumbled something unintelligible and quickly fled. The answer was "English literature" [laughter] He couldn't bring himself to admit it. That story is emblematic of the whole problem.

My father, [politician and author] Tsurumi Yusuke, was chairman of the English Law Department at First High School [Japan's most prestigious prewar college preparatory school] and therefore thought of himself as the most cultivated man in Japan.

When he visited America for the first time, in the entourage of the Christian educator Nitobe Inazo, he was left alone in his hotel room. He wanted to phone Professor Nitobe's room, but didn't know how use the telephone -- that was something they hadn't taught him in college. My father could read the works of Carlyle, the 19th century British philosopher, but he couldn't make a phone call, he couldn't even say "hello." He told me he felt utterly humiliated. The English he had learned proved useless as a communication tool.

Has any other country experienced such a colossal failure in English language education? Now there's something I'd like you to research on the Internet. If you compare the histories of similar failures in other countries, you could come up with some solid data. If Japan turns out to be the worst disaster of all, I'd like to see that evidence rubbed in the face of the Education Ministry.

A Bunch of Hackneyed American English Cliches

Muro:
It seems to me that Japanese education has not only produced people who can't say "hello" on the phone, but people who speak English with perfect diction but no meaning. Can you comment on that?

Tsurumi:
Seventeen years ago in London, they held an international conference on the Edo Period [1600-1867]. The conference was sponsored by the Japan Foundation in conjunction with an Edo exhibit at a London museum. It was a nice hotel, and they threw a fantastic banquet for 100 Japan scholars from all over the world, complete with a speech by the Japanese consul.

The consul was educated after the Second World War, so his English pronunciation was good, as was his intonation. But he had nothing to say. Because his English was so clear, the emptiness of his speech was all the more glaring. It was as if he'd studied solely for the purpose of passing his college exams, and hadn't really learned anything of substance.

Better he should have given a little greeting in Japanese, something like "Thanks for coming, all of you. Please relax and enjoy your dinner" -- and then sat down. That would have shown much better taste on his part. Do you think anyone was impressed with the consul's fine command of English? No! All he did was string together a bunch of hackneyed American English cliches.

Before the war, the Japanese had a harder time pronouncing foreign languages properly. The story goes that Ishii Kikujiro, the politician and diplomat, gave a speech in French to the League of Nations, but was crestfallen when a Frenchman told him afterward, "That was a fine speech. I had no idea the Japanese language was so similar to French." Ishii was a man of some historical significance; his name is on the Ishii-Lansing Agreement of 1917 between Japan and the U.S. But his linguistic ability still left something to be desired.

There were exceptions. Komura Jutaro, who was Japan's ambassador plenipotentiary to the Treaty of Portsmouth in 1905, could speak English. So could Shidehara Kijuro, who participated in the Washington Conference in 1921.

I once stayed at the home of Saito Hiroshi, who was Japan's ambassador to the U.S. His English was incredibly good. When a Japanese Navy plane erroneously blew up the American gunboat Panay, he had to give a speech in English to apologize and explain what had happened. This was in the midst of Japan's war with China, and relations with the U.S. weren't good, but his apology was sincere and beautifully expressed. It must have had an effect, too, because when Saito died in the U.S. in 1939, the American government returned his remains to Japan aboard the warship Astoria.

After the war, the Foreign Ministry of Japan did a complete about-face and its envoys were suddenly capable of comprehending and speaking English. But they no longer had anything to say. That was made painfully clear to me when I heard the speech by the Japanese consul at the London conference.

Necessity is Crucial to Communication
Muro:
During the first half of the 19th century, Japan was still a closed country. But sometimes, as a result of storms at sea, people were marooned outside of Japan and then returned later. I know you've written extensively about one of these experiences -- John Manjiro. What was it like for him?

Tsurumi:
Manjiro lived in the days before Japan had a formal education system. They were better off then, before English was taught in the schools. Manjiro [1827-1898] was the son of a fisherman who was born toward the end of the Shogunate era. In 1841, he was shipwrecked on an uninhabited island in the Pacific.

When an American whaling ship appeared offshore, how do you suppose Manjiro communicated with them? He was just a 14-year-old fisherboy and had never been to school. His means of communication consisted of body English -- big expressive gestures. When the ship's crew got close enough to see him, he gestured that his stomach was empty. Hunger gave rise to urgent necessity, and necessity is a crucial ingredient of communication.

Manjiro's gestures told them he was a castaway, and that he was starving. They took him aboard the ship, and fed him some kind of thin rice gruel. Manjiro got angry because he thought they were ignoring his hunger. But it was on the captain's orders: the captain knew that Manjiro shouldn't be fed any solid food at first. After a few days, they started giving him solid food.

Once Manjiro had recovered, he was given work as a ship's hand. In the course of his chores he'd pick up a few words at a time; in fact he learned English very quickly. Captain Whitfield realized Manjiro was a clever lad and brought him home with him to Fairhaven, Massachusetts. In Fairhaven, Manjiro went to school but he also learned the cooper's trade.

Manjiro was a great man. After school, when he first found work on a ship, the captain treated him like an ignorant Oriental and tried to cheat him. Manjiro wouldn't take it and left the ship. In a few years, he'd not only learned English, he'd learned the ways of America. Later, when he joined the crew of an American whaling ship, they chose him to be first mate. That was how much they trusted him.

Later, he went to California for the Gold Rush. At first, he dug for gold by hand; then, when he'd made some money that way, he invested it in a gold-digging machine. Most of his fellow forty-niners spent their earnings on liquor and women, but Manjiro bought a boat with his savings. He took the boat with him aboard a whaler and had them drop him off the coast of Japan. So he returned to his isolationist homeland, knowing that he might well be put to death for leaving the country. Long after Manjiro returned to Japan, they were still talking about him in Fairhaven.

The letter he wrote to Captain Whitfield when he got home is wonderful. The first line is, "Dear Friend." The English in this letter eloquently expresses both the depth of his feelings and his attitude of equality toward the benefactor who saved his life, took him home, and gave him an education. Manjiro had truly mastered the English language.

The problem is that each of us is transmitting our messages from our own little hole. Our message has to reach another person some distance away in his own hole. Then that person transmits back to us. That's communication.

With English or with the Internet, the question is the same: how do we send our message from our own hole to another's? Manjiro knew how. The challenge for you is, can your online journal communicate in English as well as Manjiro did?

The challenge for the Internet is the same: like the starving and marooned Manjiro, users have to feel an urgent necessity to communicate. Otherwise it will just be another "new age" media novelty and that will be that.

Messages from Orwell's Hole in India
Muro:
Like John Manjiro, you travelled to the United States to learn English. What was your experience like?

Tsurumi:
In 1937, when I was 15, I left Japan for America. I didn't understand a word of English at first, but I learned it quickly, and was attending Harvard when war broke out between the U.S. and Japan.

When the FBI interviewed me, I told them I supported neither the American nor the Japanese government, so they arrested me for being an anarchist. I wound up writing my graduation thesis for Harvard on top of a toilet seat in a jail cell. My Harvard professor was kind enough to make a special trip to the jail to give me my oral exam. In August 1942, I finally arrived back in Japan aboard a prisoner exchange ship.

When I entered the Japanese Navy, I told them I could speak English, so I was assigned to produce a daily newspaper at the naval base in Jakarta. My commanding officer ordered me to "make the same kind of newspaper the enemy reads." I'd stay up all night listening to shortwave broadcasts in English and taking notes, then hurry to the office first thing in the morning and prepare that day's paper.

I could pick up Australian radio, ABC from America, and even Indian radio. The broadcasts from India were a project of George Orwell's, and they were fascinating. An hour-long show might begin with the announcement, "Tonight we will hear T.S. Eliot talk about James Joyce's Finnegans Wake." I could hear E.M. Forster talk too. That was the ultimate pleasure. I had no idea Orwell was behind these broadcasts; I only learned that later. But somehow these messages from Orwell's hole in India reached my hole at a Japanese navy base in Jakarta. I wonder if the Internet can be like that.

I've never done as much translation as I did to produce that newspaper. Actually, it wasn't translation so much as adaptation. I hadn't gone to school in Japan, so I used different brain circuitry than what they train you to use to produce my Japanese characters. Then I'd cover up my deficiencies with lots of military jargon. My writing was awful. I'd been reading and writing English in the U.S. for the past five years, so I'd forgotten how to write in my native tongue.

But I wanted to continue my studies somehow, and I remember reading the Japanese translation of a book titled The Function of the Brain. The Japanese word for "brain" is written with two rather complicated kanji characters. Try as I might to keep notes, I couldn't write those characters correctly. It was easier for me to write "brain" in English. So I wound up taking notes in English on a Japanese translation of a book that was originally written in English.

After the war ended, it took me more than a year or two to regain my mastery of Japanese. It felt more like six or seven years. Professor Kuwabara Takeo, who convinced me to go to Kyoto University, knew how much this bothered me. When Professor Kuwabara met the novelist Shiga Naoya, he asked Shiga on my behalf, "We have this fellow here with this problem. What should we do about it?"

Shiga's reply was, "He doesn't have to mimic the great works of Japanese literature. Let him flounder around in the gap between Japanese and English. Through his struggles he'll develop his own style of writing in Japanese." It was good advice.

So, little by little, I learned how to write in Japanese. That I've been able to make a living as a writer for several decades since then is something of a miracle.

Floundering in the Gap between Languages
Muro:
Shiga refers to letting people "flounder around in the gap between languages" to achieve their personal writing style. Can you give me some examples?

Tsurumi:
In America, when I was 16 or 17, I was given a copy of Seldon Rodman's Anthology of Modern Poetry. The book contained a speech by the Italian immigrants Sacco and Vanzetti -- one they gave in court declaring their innocence after being arrested as anarchists and sentenced to death. Their English was anything but fancy. It was full of flaws, but incredibly powerful.

A special power emerged from the struggle of Sacco and Vanzetti to express themselves in English. That may be what Shiga Naoya was trying to tell me. Struggle gives birth to language that is full of life.

Why are children so expressive with language? Because of the power of their struggle. Their language is far more powerful than the bland language of adults. Perhaps on the Internet, struggles of this sort will give birth to language with a new vitality.

Let me give an example of a man I've actually met: the Korean poet Kim Chi-Ha. Kim's English isn't very good, and he can't speak Japanese at all. I went to South Korea in 1972 and was able to visit him in the hospital room where he was being held under house arrest. When I showed him all the signatures on the petition I had brought, protesting his death sentence and appealing for clemency, Kim stood up and said, "Your movement cannot help me. But I will add my name to it to help your movement."

What forceful words! There was so much power in Kim's limited English. You can't even begin to compare it with the English speech by the Japanese consul to those 100 scholars in the London hotel. Kim's English was the real thing. English on the Internet should be the same way.

Joseph Conrad, the British novelist, wrote English that was full of flaws. Yet Conrad is considered one of the greatest writers in the history of English literature. His grammatical slips were not serious errors, of course. His mother tongue was Polish; his second language was Russian, and his third was French. English was number four.

At age 17, Conrad worked on a French freighter and later got work on a British ship. Apparently, he was thrilled to hear English spoken. It just so happened that the Nobel Prize-winning English writer John Galsworthy was a passenger on that ship. Conrad got Galsworthy to edit his writing, and he also collaborated with Ford Madox Ford.

In his autobiography, American writer George Santayana says he left Spain and came to the U.S. when he was eight. His father left him with his mother in America and returned to Spain. That's why all of Santayana's work is in English. But until he died in his eighties, he retained the feeling that English was not his mother tongue. In fact, his English is a little different than American English.

So you have a choice. You can pay heed to the mother tongue you have retained inside you since childhood and utilize it in the language you use today -- or you can completely forget your mother tongue sensibility, your childhood sensibility, and if you're an American now, speak the language of Americans, conforming to their rules of language. The difference between these two approaches is significant.

Unorthodox but Powerful Speech
Muro:
What you just said reminds me of English speeches I have heard by two individuals, the Dalai Lama and Nelson Mandela. Their speeches were the most moving I have ever heard in English.

The Dalai Lama gives his speeches and sermons in English, but he keeps a young interpreter beside him. At some point, he may suddenly switch into Tibetan, then continue his discourse in Tibetan for a while. When this happens, the interpreter smoothly steps forward and translates what the Dalai Lama is saying until he switches back to English. I heard him give an entire sermon about the Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva in this manner, moving easily between English and Tibetan. It seemed downright miraculous.

Nelson Mandela is also a powerful speaker in English. When I heard him he had just been released from prison and was not yet president of the Republic of South Africa. Both of these men speak English with their own distinctive pronunciation, intonation, and vocabulary.

Tsurumi:
It's important to recognize the power that comes from having several languages overlap with one another.

Lafcadio Hearn, who was known for his English adaptations of Japanese ghost stories, took an interest in Creole dialects before he came to Japan. One of his earliest works, Gombo Zhebes, was a Creole dictionary. Hearn's parents were Greek and Irish, and he was educated in France before he came to America.

By the time he got to Japan, Hearn was already well along in years, and he couldn't read or speak Japanese very well at all. The things he wrote in his minimal broken Japanese were referred to as "Hearn-san's language." You can still see the postcards he wrote to his Japanese wife. They're written in awkward Japanese that wouldn't have won him any literary prizes. But that same Hearn-san's language was the soul of the ghost stories he put in his book Kwaidan.

At night, Hearn would have his wife tell him ghost stories she knew in Japanese, over and over again. Then he would write them down in English. The English of Kwaidan is quite orthodox. But it is English rooted in the recollection, formed in his mind in "Hearn-san" Japanese, of those Japanese words his wife repeated to him in the dark of night.

Among my contemporaries, someone I admire for her spoken Japanese is [actress and writer] Edith Hanson. I think she's one of the finest Japanese speakers of her era. And then there are the Japan-born Korean writers Kim Shi-Jon, Kim DalSu, and Ko Sa-Myon, all first-rate Japanese wordsmiths.

One of the finest Japanese writers of English I've met is the Zen Buddhist scholar D.T. Suzuki. After the war, when my teacher Charles Morris, the philosopher, came to Japan, I went with him to meet Suzuki. Morris was interested in Zen and asked Suzuki many questions. Suzuki answered him in incredibly slow English. His speech was like the slow stage movements of a Noh actor.

Nowadays, English language study tapes force you to speak English at an incredibly fast pace. But you shouldn't try to speak faster than the speed at which you're comfortably in command of the language. If you speak a foreign language any faster than that, you'll only sound like some idiot trying to imitate a native speaker, and what you say will be nonsense. Suzuki, with that slow speech of his, had a tremendous influence in both England and America. When you speak at your own pace, your thoughts go into the words you speak.

If the Internet is infused with respect for the power of unorthodox language -- Hearn-san's language, Creole language, the English of Sacco and Vanzetti, of Kim Chi-Ha, Santayana, Suzuki or Conrad -- then that can be a force in preventing the Internet from becoming just another part of the America-centered global media juggernaut.

So what is the genius loci, the guardian spirit, of the Internet? Will it put down roots in Japan and at the same time will this spirit fly away from here? That's the question you have to resolve.


文化の壁をこえて心にとどく言葉
鶴見俊輔

 鶴見俊輔さんは現代日本のもっとも影響力をもつ知識人のひとりだ。その鶴見さんを京都市郊外、岩倉の自宅にたずねた。
 氏の話は、近代日本における英語教育の失敗の歴史にはじまり、身ぶり手ぶり、ときに大きな笑い声をまじえて飛ぶがごとくにすすんで、文化をこえたコミュニケーションの可能性へと向かう。

 「でも私はね、インターネットにかんしては、この人(夫人の横山貞子さん)の手助けなしには何もできないんだ。わっはっは」

 鶴見さんは戦後、京都、東京、メキシコシティ、モントリオールなどの大学でおしえ、また、50年間つづいた『思想の科学』を中心に、さまざまな本や雑誌の編集にかかわってきたが、いまはそれらのしごとからは手をひき、夫人とふたり、京都でしずかに暮らしている。しかしその好奇心と知的活力は、私が32年まえにはじめてお会いしたときと変わらない。(室謙二)

近代日本の英語教育は完全な失敗だった
——私たちの雑誌は、世界中のより多くの人々に読んでもらいたいと願って、日本語のほかに英語でもだすことにしました。いまインターネットでは英語が事実上の共通語になっているからです。ことなる言語を話す者同士が、ものごとの本質を伝えあうために、英語というコミュニケーションの道具を、どのように使っていくべきなんでしょうか。

 英語を共通語にするには、いまのアメリカ英語と同じような英語を使ってはだめだね。この雑誌は、インターネット上の日本の英語文化、日本人がつくる共通言語としての英語が、どういうものになるかのテストケースでしょう。
 いまのアメリカに合わせて媚びていくところからは、世界文化は生まれない。アメリカ文化をたくみに学習するだけのことです。それでは、ほかの国の人々には尊敬されないし、アメリカ人にも、やはり尊敬されないでしょう。

 日本における130年間の英語教育の歴史は、完全な失敗だったと思う。いまは中学校で3年、高等学校で3年、大学で4年、あわせて10年間も英語を勉強している。それでいて自分から英語で発信する能力がまったくないんだ。
 1883年(明治16)生まれで、簡素で力強い日本語を書いた志賀直哉の短編に、瀬戸内海の船に乗っていたら、イギリス人が話しかけてくる話がある。
 「君は大学生か?」
 「そうだ」
 そのくらいはできる。でも「何科か」と聞かれると、黙って、むにゃむにゃと船室に帰っちゃう。英文科なのに、じぶんが何科であるかさえ言えないんだ。これがすべてを象徴している。

 私の親父の鶴見祐輔(政治家、著述家)は、一高英法科を首席で卒業した。だから自分は日本全国で一番優秀な人間だと思っていた。その優秀な人間が、教育者でキリスト者の新渡戸稲造のお供をして、生まれてはじめてアメリカへ行ったとき、ひとりでホテルの部屋に残された。新渡戸先生の部屋に電話をかけたいんだけど、電話がかけられない。そんなこと大学で教わってないんだから。カーライルの本を読んでいても、電話ひとつかけられない。ものすごく困ったと言っていた。
 故郷の岡山から出てきて、英語の勉強を12年もやったのに、「ハロー」と言えない。かれが一所懸命まなんだ英語はコミュニケーションの道具ではなかった。他の国の例を知っているわけではないけれど、これだけ完全な言語教育の失敗例は、世界の他の国にあるだろうか。それこそインターネットで調べてもらいたいね。ここに同じ失敗があるという「失敗の歴史」を並べてみたらきっと業績になるし、他にこれほどの失敗がなかったら、その事実を文部省に突きつけてやったらいい。


うまいだけで内容のない英語はだれも尊重しない

——電話で「ハロー」も言えない日本人だけでなく、日本の教育は、いちおうは上手にしゃべる、でも表面だけの英語使いも、おおぜい生みだしてきたんじゃないでしょうか。

 いまから17年前、ロンドンで江戸時代についての国際会議があった。ロンドンの博物館が「江戸展」を開き、それに関連した国際会議を日本の国際交流基金が開催したんだ。私も参加したんだが、なかなかいいホテルだったよ。
 そのとき世界から100人の日本研究者を集めてきて立派な晩餐会をやって、そこで日本公使が演説をしたんだ。公使は戦後の教育を受けているから、英語の発音はいい。抑揚もきちんとしている。文法的にもまちがいはない。ところが、まったく無内容なんだ。きちんとわかる英語だから、よけい無内容がばれてしまう。きっと受験競争ばかりやってきたんでしょう、教養というものがない。
 たくみな英語をあやつった公使の演説は尊重されたか。否。アメリカ英語の決まりきった表現ばかりをつなげた演説を、だれも尊重するはずがない。そんな演説をするよりは、いっそ、「皆さん、今日はよくいらっしゃいました。どうぞ、ごゆるりと」と日本語で言って座ったほうが、よっぽどよかった。それが風格というもんでしょう。

 第2次大戦前も、日本人の外国語の発音はよくなかった。1905年(明治38)のポーツマス条約時の全権大使だった小村寿太郎から、21年のワシントン会議に参加した幣原(しではら)喜重郎まで、英語はよくできたけど発音はだめだった。
 外交官で政治家の石井菊次郎が国際連盟でフランス語で演説したとき、あとでフランス人に「大変に立派でした。日本語がこんなにフランス語に似ているとは思わなかった」といわれてがっくりしたという。石井は、中国に関する日本とアメリカの「石井・ランシング協定」(1917)で歴史に残っている人です。でもね、外国語の実力はそんなものだったんだ。

 例外はあるよ。若いとき、私は駐米大使だった斎藤博のところに居候していたことがある。かれはものすごく英語ができた。日本の海軍機がアメリカの砲艦パネー号を誤爆したとき、その謝罪と状況説明の英語の演説をニューヨークでやったんだ。日中戦争の最中で、アメリカと日本との関係はたいへん悪かった。でもかれの謝罪は誠意があって立派なものだった。それに報いたんだろう、1939年に斎藤が亡くなったとき、アメリカ政府は遺骨を軍艦アストリア号で日本に送還したんだ。
 日本の外務省は戦後がらっと変わって、英語を聞いてわかるし、話しもできるようになった。でも内容がなくなった。ロンドンの国際会議で日本公使の演説を聞いて、つくづくそう感じたね。


コミュニケーションは「必要」から始まる
——鶴見さんは、幕末の漂流民で、アメリカに渡ったジョン万次郎(1827〜1898)がお好きですね。江戸時代の日本は鎖国政策をとっていたから、一般の日本人が外国に行くことは絶対にできなかった。その唯一の抜け穴が漂流です。ジョン万次郎もひとりの少年漂流民として思いがけずアメリカに渡り、自分の目や耳、自分のからだでアメリカとつきあった最初の日本人のひとりになった。かれの英語はどういうものだったんでしょう?

 万次郎は日本で学校教育、英語教育がはじまる前の人なんだ。だからよかった。
 かれは1841年(天保12)に漂流して鳥島に流れついた。その沖にアメリカの捕鯨船が来たとき、学校なんか行ってない14歳の漁師の子・万次郎は、どのように通信したか。通信の手段は大きな身ぶりだ。船員たちが近づいてきて、声のやりとりができるようになると「食べたい」という身ぶり。かれは空腹だったんだ。空腹という重大な「必要」があった。コミュニケーションには、この「必要」が重要なんだ。

 必要にせまられた身ぶりで漂流者だとわかり、かれは船に引きあげられた。そして身ぶりで空腹だとわかり、重湯のようなものをもらったんだね。「自分が空腹なのを無視した冷たい奴らだ」と万次郎は怒る。でもそれは船長の指示だった。ホイットフィールド船長は、空腹の人間に固形物を食べさせてはいけないということを知っていたんだ。
 そして何日かおいて、少しずつ固形物をもらう。そのうち体が回復してくるから船の仕事の手助けをする。そうすると行動のなかに、単語がポツンポツンと混じるでしょう。そのようにして万次郎は急速に英語を覚えていった。船長は「これは賢い青年だ」と思って、マサチューセッツ州フェアヘブンの自宅に連れていった。そして学校に入る。学校にかよいながら桶屋の修業をしている。これが万次郎の物語なんだ。

 万次郎は偉大な人間なんだ。学校をでたあと船員になって捕鯨船に乗るんだけど、最初に乗った船の船長が万次郎を無知な東洋人だと思ってだますんだ。万次郎はそれにたいして、毅然とした態度で船をおりてしまう。数年で、英語だけでなくアメリカも学んでいる。その後、選ばれて副船長になる。信頼されていたんだよ。
 それからゴールドラッシュの金山に入って、手で金を掘って、お金をつくった。そのお金を、金を掘る機械に投資する。そうやって儲けたお金を、普通だったら酒と女に使うんだけれど、万次郎はボートを1隻買った。そのボートをもって捕鯨船に乗り、日本近海で降ろしてもらって、打ち首を覚悟で鎖国の日本に戻ってきた。かれが日本に帰ったあとも、かれの話はフェアヘブンでずっと伝わっていく。

 万次郎が日本に戻ってから、ホイットフィールド船長に書いた手紙もすばらしいんだ。書き出しに、「Dear Friend、懐かしき友よ」と書く。自分を助けてくれて、家につれていってくれて、教育を受けさせてくれた恩人に向かって対等な立場で呼びかける、真情にあふれた手紙なんだ。かれは英語の達人だった。対等なコミュニケーションの文化を理解していたんだね。

 大切なのは、自分のいる小さな穴から発信するということですね。それが離れたところの、やはり小さな穴の中にいる人間に伝わる。そして、その人間がまた発信をする。そうやって通信がおこなわれる。インターネットも同じことでしょう。切実な自分たちの「必要」から出発しないとだめだね。「新時代の○○」というメディアになってしまっては終わりだ。どうしたら自分の穴からの発信ができるか。万次郎はその方法を知っていた。このオンライン雑誌が自分の「必要」から出発して、はたして万次郎のような通信を英語によってできるかどうか。


日本兵として戦場で聞いたオーウェルの対外放送
——漂流民ではないけれど、鶴見さんも少年時代にアメリカに渡って英語をまなんだわけですね。鶴見さんの「必要」はどういうものだったんですか?

 私は1937年、15歳のとき日本からアメリカへ行ったんだけど、そのときは英語がまったくわからなかった。短期間で英語を習得して、ハーバード大学にいるときに日米戦争がはじまった。
 開戦後、FBIのインタビューにたいして、私はアメリカ政府も日本政府も支持しないと言った。それで無政府主義者ということで逮捕されてしまった。だから私は、ハーバード大学の卒業論文は留置場のトイレの蓋をテーブルにして書いたんだ。口頭試問は、ハーバードの教授が留置場まで出むいて、特別にやってくれた。そして交換船で、1942年8月20日に日本に帰ってきたんだ。
 そしてすぐに海軍にとられてインドネシアに渡り、英語がわかるというので、毎日、ジャカルタの海軍基地で新聞をつくっていた。
 「敵が読むのと同じ新聞をつくってくれ」
 と部隊長に言われて、一晩中、英語の短波放送を聞いてノートをつくり、朝、事務所に行ったらすぐにその日の新聞をつくるんだ。オーストラリア放送、アメリカのABC、それからインド放送……。
 BBCのインド放送はジョージ・オーウェルが企画していたんだけれど、これがものすごく面白かった。T.S.エリオットの話はあるし、E.M. フォスターの話はあるし、最高の娯楽だった。でも私は、オーウェルがつくった番組だなんてことはぜんぜん知らないで聞いていた。あとになって知ったんだ。でも、インドにいたオーウェルの穴から発せられたメッセージは、ジャカルタの日本海軍の基地にいた私の穴にとどいていた。

——そういう文化の壁の越え方がインターネットでもできるといいな。それにしても、戦場で、英語と日本語のあいだで生きるというのは、じつに奇妙な経験だったでしょうね。

 あのときほど翻訳をたくさんしたことはなかったね。実際には、翻訳ではなくて翻案だったけど。
 私は日本で学校に行ってないから日本語がうまく書けないんだ。15歳からの約5年間、アメリカで英語を聞いて書いていたから、書く言語としての日本語を失っていた。だから、どう翻訳していいかわからないんだよ。日本語が書けないとバレたら大変だから、懸命に隠す。学校以外の別の回路でまなんだ日本語の字を書いて、なんとか翻案する。海軍用語や軍隊用語を使ってごまかす。ひどい文体だったよ。
 海軍にいたとき、なんとか勉強をつづけたいと思って、シャラーの『脳髄の機能』という本を日本語訳で読んでいた。読みながらノートをとろうとしても、日本語が書けない。たとえば「脳髄」なんて、むずかしい漢字でしょ。私には英語で「brain」と書くほうが簡単だった。だから、もともと英語で書かれた本の日本語訳を読みながら、英語でノートをとっていたんだ。

 戦争が終わっても、1年や2年で簡単に日本語をとり戻せるものじゃない。6、7年かかったような気がするね。当時、私を京都大学に引っ張ってくれた桑原武夫さんは、私がそういう悩みをもっているのを知っていた。それで作家の志賀直哉に会ったときに、桑原さんが「こういう人がいるのですが、どうしたらいいでしょうか?」と、私に代わって質問してくれた。志賀さんの答えは、
 「日本語の名文を手本にする必要はない。日本語と英語のあいだに落ちて、もがく。そこから自分の日本語の文章が生まれ育ってくる」
 これは適切な助言だったね。そのようにして、私はゆっくりゆっくり、日本語が書けるようになった。それ以来、文章を書いて何十年も生活することができたのは、奇跡だね。


もがきの力が、いきいきとした言葉を生む
——言葉と言葉、文化と文化の間に落ちて、もがく。「もがく力」というのがあるんですね。

 16歳か17歳のとき、私はアメリカで、セルドン・ロドマンの『近代詩集』という本をもらった。そこに、イタリア移民のサッコとヴァンゼッティの演説がのっていた。かれらはアナキストの容疑で捕まって死刑宣告を受け、法廷で無罪を訴える演説をする。高級な英語でもなんでもない。間違いだらけの英語で、それがものすごい迫力なんだ。
 サッコ、ヴァンゼッティの、できない英語を駆使するときの力、もがくときにあらわれる力というのがあるんだ。それは志賀直哉が私にした助言と同じかもしれない。もがきの力が、いきいきとした言葉を生む。

 なぜ子どもは言語の達人なのか。それはもがきの力だ。大人の言語、平たい言語よりずうっと迫力があるんだ。私が実際に出会った人間でいえば、韓国の詩人キムジハ(金芝河)がそうだった。私は1972年に韓国に行って、当時の韓国政府によってキムジハが軟禁されている病院の部屋に入ることができたんだ。そして「あなたが死刑を宣告されたことにたいする反対、助命嘆願が日本でこんなに集まっているんだ」と署名をみせたら、キムジハは立ちあがって、こう言った。

 Your movement can not help me. But I will add my name to it to help your movement.

 すごい迫力があるんだよ。キムジハは英語がうまくない。でも、うまくない英語のなかに込めた力がある。それはロンドンのホテルで100人の研究者を集めておこなった日本公使の英語の演説とはくらべものにならない。キムジハの英語のほうが本物なんだ。インターネットのなかでも、そういうもがきから、新しい活力のある言語が生まれてくれるといいね。アメリカのインターネットの英語を手本にする必要はない。

 イギリスの作家のコンラッドも、まちがいだらけの英語を書いた。コンラッドの母語はポーランド語でしょう。2番目はロシア語、3番目はフランス語、そして4番目が英語……
 かれは17歳くらいで水夫になり、フランスの貨物船に乗る。やがてイギリス船に乗る。そのときに英語がとっても愉快に響いたらしい。偶然、船客のひとりにノーベル賞作家のゴールズワージーがいたという幸運もある。彼に、いろいろ文章をなおしてもらい、フォード・マドックス・フォードとの共著もある。ひとりで書くようになってからは間違いが多いが、英文学史上の最高の書き手であることに変わりはない。文法上の間違いは、もっとも重大な失策ではないんです。
 サンタヤナの英語も、アメリカの英語とはちょっと違う。かれは8歳のときにスペインを離れて、アメリカに来た。だからかれの著作はすべて英語だよ。しかし八十数歳で死ぬまで、サンタヤナには「英語は自分にとっての母語ではない」という感覚があったらしい。
  母語の感覚、自分のなかにある幼い時の感覚を重んじて、いま使っている言語に生かしていくか、あるいは、母語の感覚や幼い時の感覚をすっかり忘れて、たとえばいまのアメリカ人の英語をそのルールにしたがって滑らかに使っていくか。この2つの違いは重要だよ。


正統的でない言葉がもつ力を尊重する気風
——いまのお話を聞いていて、私は2人の英語の演説を思いだしました。ダライ・ラマとネルソン・マンデラです。この2人の演説が、私がこれまでに聞いた、もっとも感動的な英語の演説です。
 ダライ・ラマはわきに若い通訳をつれて、英語で法話をする。あるところで急にチベット語になって、しばらくはチベット語で話がすすむのです。その間は、通訳が自然に前にでてきて通訳している。そしてまた自然に英語になる。英語とチベット語のあいだを自由自在に行き来しながら、観音菩薩の話をしたのです。神業のような感じでした。
  ネルソン・マンデラの英語も迫力があった。釈放されたすぐあとで、まだ南アフリカ共和国の大統領になる前のことでしたが。ともに、独特の英語の発音、イントネーション、そして語彙をもっていますね。

 いくつかの言語が重なりあっているところから生まれる力が大切だね。
 日本の怪談を英語で採話したラフカディオ・ハーンは、ギリシア人とアイルランド人が両親で、フランスで教育を受けてからアメリカに来た。日本に来る以前は、クレオール語に興味をもっていた。かれの初期の著書『ゴンボ・ゼーブ』は、クレオール語の辞典だね。
 日本に来たときは、もう年をとっていて、日本語を楽々と読むこともできないし、しゃべることもできない。わずかに片言のように書くものが、「ヘルンさん言葉」といわれている。かれが細君にあてたハガキなどが残っている。たどたどしい言葉で、それ自体は名文とはいえない。しかしその「ヘルンさん言葉」が『怪談』の魂になっているんだ。
 かれは夜になると、細君に知っている怪談を日本語で話してもらう。何度も、何度も話に聞き入り、それを英語に書きなおした。『怪談』の英語は正統的な英語だ。でもそれは細君が夜の暗闇のなかで何度も話した日本語を、耳で聞いて、「ヘルンさん言葉」の日本語で理解し記憶して、それから書きしるした英語なんだ。
 インターネットのなかに、こういう正統的な言葉ではない言葉の力、「ヘルンさん言葉」であったり、クレオール語だったり、サッコ、ヴァンゼッティの英語、キムジハの英語、あるいはサンタヤナ、コンラッドの英語の力を尊重する気風ができてくれば、それがインターネットがアメリカ中心の世界メディアになることを止める力になるのではないかな。

 いまの人でいうと、イーデス・ハンソンのしゃべる日本語には感心している。当代一の日本語の使い手だと思う。それから在日朝鮮人作家のキムシジョン(金時鐘)だな。同じ在日朝鮮人作家のキムダルス(金達寿)もコサミョン(高史明)も、すぐれた日本語の使い手だ。

 私が出会った日本人ですぐれた英語の使い手は、宗教家の鈴木大拙だ。戦後、私の先生だった哲学者のチャールズ・モーリスが日本にやってきて、いっしょに鈴木大拙のところに行った。モーリスは禅に興味をもっていて、いろいろ質問をする。大拙の答えは、ものすごくゆっくりした英語なんだ。能の足取りと同じようにゆっくりしていた。
 いまの英語教育のテープなんて、ものすごいスピードで話すし、話させる。自分が使いこなせるスピードを超えてはいけないんだ。それを超えたスピードで外国語を話すと、愚かにもネイティブ・スピーカーを真似ることだけになって、無内容になる。自分にあったスピードはなにか。つまり考える力をもっているわけ。自分の考えがその言葉に乗っているんだよ、大拙の場合。大拙は、そのゆっくりと話す英語で、イギリスに行ってもアメリカに行っても大きな影響をあたえた。
 さて、インターネットにとってのジーニアス・ローサイ(守護神)は何か。日本を根拠地にする。しかしそこから魂が飛ぶようなもの。それを探りあてることが問題だね。
Comments 
Friday May 19th, 2006 6:18 (UTC)
I was annoyed in Hamilton because poker wasn't initially my thing and I felt ignored during the pizza/breadstick thing. Nothing beyond that, really.

Well, that and stop making fun of me for not drinking or smoking or snorting. But that's more Josh.
Friday May 19th, 2006 17:26 (UTC)
oh, I think there's more than that...
Wednesday May 24th, 2006 4:32 (UTC) - re poker
YES. Chips good.
This page was loaded Dec 18th 2017, 20:11 GMT.